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AAA: Daylight Saving Time causes higher risk of drowsy driving

AAA says, missing just two to three hours of sleep, can more than quadruple your risk for a crash.
Daylight Saving Time
Daylight Saving Time(KFYR-TV)
Published: Mar. 15, 2021 at 5:57 AM EDT
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HARRISONBURG, Va. (WHSV) - Daylight Saving Time this weekend caused us to lose an hour of sleep Saturday into Sunday. It will now stay dark for longer in the morning, and remain light for longer at night.

Morgan Dean with AAA Mid-Atlantic says, this shift can cause a higher risk of driving while tired.

“When we go through the Daylight Saving Time change, it’s a lot like jet lag,” Dean said. “Our bodies are just out of sync, we’re conscious that something has changed very quickly and that’s a concern for people.”

AAA says, missing just two to three hours of sleep, can more than quadruple your risk for a crash.

As many students return to in-person learning, you’re likely to see more school buses on your morning commute. AAA says, it’s critical that you’re awake and alert, even though it may still be dark out.

“Some drivers may not have seen school buses in about a year now,” said Dean. “So we’re reminding people drive slower, be on the lookout for the bus slowing down and stopping, lookout for children stepping up into the road or at the edge of the road waiting for the bus stop.”

To avoid driving while tired, AAA suggests getting at least seven hours of sleep.

If you’re driving and notice you’re having trouble keeping your eyes open, drifting from your lane or you’re not remembering the last few miles driven, you should get off the road and make an adjustment to help you focus.

Dean says that adjustment can mean taking a break, eating something or even taking a nap in your car.

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