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What’s up in the sky?: Week of 04/12-04/18

Clouds cleared out enough to get a shot of the Worm Moon. The first of four consecutive...
Clouds cleared out enough to get a shot of the Worm Moon. The first of four consecutive supermoons.(Tony Alverson)
Published: Apr. 11, 2021 at 9:31 PM EDT
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(WHSV) - We’ve made it to the middle of April! Let’s take a look at what’s up in the sky this week.

Adding Daylight

Over the next week, we will gain about 15 minutes of added daylight again. The rate at which we gain daylight will continue to go down. This week it will be 4 minutes from 2 minutes and 24 seconds a day to 2 minutes and 20 seconds a day. By April 18th, sunrise will be at 6:34 am and sunset will be at 7:55 pm. We will have 13 hours and 20 minutes of daylight by April 18th with 10 hours and 40 minutes of darkness.

ISS Viewing (Most Viewable)

The International Space Station will continue to pass during daylight this week. The next time you can view the International Space Station is April 22nd.

Moon Phases & Next Full Moon:

Moon PhaseDate and Time
First Quarter MoonApril 20th, 2:58 am
Full MoonApril 26th, 11:31 pm
Third Quarter MoonMay 3rd, 3:50 pm
New MoonMay 11th, 2:59 pm

The next full moon is called the Pink Moon. The Pink Moon’s name comes from the pink blooms of a wildflower Phlox subulata. This will be the second of four consecutive super moons in 2021.

The next new moon will be a micro new moon. This means the moon will be the farthest away from Earth in the moon’s regular orbit.

Interesting Events:

Tuesday April 13th, the asteroid Juno will become visible between midnight and dawn. The view will be faint as it crosses the sky less than a finger’s width from the medium bright star Mu Ophiuchi. You can use the star to locate and view the asteroid with a telescope.

The asteroid will pass by the distant star, Mu Ophiuchi
The asteroid will pass by the distant star, Mu Ophiuchi(Stellarium)

Thursday April 15th, in the lower third of the western sky after dusk, the young crescent moon will shine just a few finger widths to the right of the star Aldebaran, which marks the southerly eye of Taurus, the Bull. You’ll have to use binoculars to help locate the stars. First, find the V-shaped group of stars in the Hyades Cluster that form the bull’s face. Those stars are sprinkled downward to the right of Aldebaran. The bull’s northern eye is the star Ain, which will be positioned between Aldebaran and the moon.

The star Ain and the star Aldebaran are the north and south portion's of the Bull's Eye, there...
The star Ain and the star Aldebaran are the north and south portion's of the Bull's Eye, there will be a V-shaped cluster of stars to help identify this.(Stellarium)

Friday April 16th, in the western sky after dusk, the waxing crescent moon will be positioned a palm’s width below Mars. The following night, the moon will move to Mars’ upper left.

Friday night, the young crescent moon will be to the lower right of Mars.
Friday night, the young crescent moon will be to the lower right of Mars.(Stellarium)
Saturday April 17th, the moon will be located to the upper left of Mars.
Saturday April 17th, the moon will be located to the upper left of Mars.(Stellarium)

Saturday April 17th, once the sky has darkened, position your binoculars on the waxing crescent moon and look for a dense clump of dim stars sitting just to the moon’s lower left. The star cluster in Gemini is known as Messier 35 or the Shoe-Buckle Cluster.

The Shoe-Buckle Cluster of stars will be right to the left of the Moon Saturday night.
The Shoe-Buckle Cluster of stars will be right to the left of the Moon Saturday night.(Stellarium)

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