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Longest day of the year coming this week up in the sky

The full moon rising Tuesday night
The full moon rising Tuesday night(Warren Faught)
Published: Jun. 19, 2022 at 11:00 PM EDT
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(WHSV) - A busy week up in the sky coming. This includes the longest day of the year known as the summer solstice!

Losing Daylight

We will be losing a whopping 1 minute of daylight over the course of this week. By Monday, June 27th, we’ll have 14 hours and 50 minutes of daylight and 9 hours and 10 minutes of nighttime. Sunrise moves from 5:51 am to 5:53 am while sunset still gets later moving from 8:42 pm to 8:43 pm.

ISS Viewing (Most Viewable)

DateVisibleMax HeightAppearsDisappears
Saturday, June 25th, 5:06 am6 min70°above SWabove NE
Sunday, June 26th, 4:20 am4 min37°above Sabove ENE

Moon Phases & Next Full Moon:

Moon PhaseDate and Time
Third Quarter MoonMonday, June 20th, 11:10 pm
New MoonTuesday, June 28th, 10:52 pm
First Quarter MoonWednesday, July 6th, 10:14 pm
Full MoonWednesday, July 13th, 2:37 pm

Next Full Moon

The next full moon will be Wednesday, July 13th at 2:37 pm and is known as the Buck Moon. This roots from Native Americans as male deer begin to regrow their antlers typically in July. Some other names for this full moon include the Thunder Moon, due to the summer storms in the month. It is also known as the Hay Moon, because of July being hay harvest.

Summer Solstice

On Tuesday, June 21st, we will have the longest day of the year. On this day, the amount of daylight we will receive will be 14 hours and 51 minutes. Sunrise will be at 5:51 am with sunset at 8:42 pm. Sunrises will begin to move later in the morning while sunsets will continue to stay at the same time or later until July 4th. We will continuously lose daylight from this point until the winter solstice on December 21st.

Other Interesting Events

On Tuesday, June 21st, the moon will shine a palm’s width to the lower right of Jupiter before dawn. You can view this in the east-southeastern sky. Jupiter will be able to view with the naked eye when it rises after 1 am until sunrise. You will have to view Jupiter with binoculars if you wait until later in the morning.

The moon will be to the lower right of Jupiter Tuesday morning before dawn.
The moon will be to the lower right of Jupiter Tuesday morning before dawn.(Stellarium)

On Wednesday, June 22nd, the moon will be a palm’s width to the right of Mars. This will be in the eastern sky before dawn. Jupiter will be shining to the upper right of the moon and Mars, creating an opportunity to view the three bodies in the same pair of binoculars.

Mars will be to the left of the moon with Jupiter to the upper right
Mars will be to the left of the moon with Jupiter to the upper right(Stellarium)

On Friday, June 24th, the moon will be a palm’s width to the upper right of Uranus. This will be before dawn. Before dawn on Saturday, the moon will be located a little closer to the upper right of Uranus. You will be able to view the pair with binoculars. Look for these two bodies in the eastern sky.

Uranus will be to the bottom left of the moon Friday morning
Uranus will be to the bottom left of the moon Friday morning(Stellarium)

On Sunday, June 26th, the moon will be located to the left of Venus. They will be located in the east-northeastern horizon and you can view the duo with the naked eye or with binoculars. This will be occurring within a hour before sunrise.

On Sunday morning, Venus will be located to the right of the moon
On Sunday morning, Venus will be located to the right of the moon(Stellarium)

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