Braille literacy displays out for Blindness Awareness Month

Staunton’s TBC identifies blindness as a spectrum and provides resources to bridge the joy in a book.
Published: Oct. 4, 2022 at 7:25 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

STAUNTON, Va. (WHSV) - The Talking Book Center in Staunton shows there is more than one way to read a book. The blindness awareness display showcases technology that people who are vision-impaired have used throughout the years.

The staff shared that many people are not aware of the service so the display is meant to spotlight braille literacy.

“It’s important, I think, to promote blind awareness in the community and get sort of a community understanding of what it is to be blind in a different reading literacy, navigating the world, and that community, in general, is aware of that the blind community also,” Talking Book Center Supervisor Ilia Dejardins explained.

Dejardins points out that her award-winning program serves a wide variety of 300 participants.

“Anyone with macular degeneration retinopathy things of that nature,” Dejardins said. “It’s also for print-disabled, so if somebody would like Parkinson’s, MSMGA, cerebral palsy, so it helps those who can’t physically turn pages.”

Free audio and braille books and magazines have been mailed out for the last 40 years. Staunton’s TBC identifies blindness as a spectrum and provides resources to bridge the joy in a book.

“It’s not the end,” Dejardins asserted. “There are so many different options from screen readers to little gadgets to different things that can help a person remain independent, so it’s not the end, it’s just the start of something new with the new journey and reading.”

Different versions of the display are available all month at public libraries in Staunton, Waynesboro, and Fisherville.