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Shenandoah Valley residents react to proposed popular vote compact

Even if the bill passes the General Assembly, it wouldn't go into effect immediately. | Credit: WHSV
Even if the bill passes the General Assembly, it wouldn't go into effect immediately. | Credit: WHSV(WHSV)
Published: Feb. 12, 2020 at 6:50 PM EST
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The General Assembly is looking at a proposal that could change how Virginian votes count in presidential elections.

vote on Tuesday. It's known as the "National Popular Vote Compact" and it would join Virginia into a national compact in which states agree to award their electoral votes to the presidential ticket that receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Typically, Virginia's electoral college votes are given to the candidate who wins the state. Mathew Maples said he thinks the bill is a good idea.

"It seems like the founding fathers kind of assumed we were all too stupid to make votes on our own, and so now, we live in a much more educated time,' Maples said.

The bill would allow Virginia to enter the compact with 15 other states and Washington D.C. Maples said he thinks its important that the person who wins the presidency reflects what the people actually want.

"Hillary Clinton, love her or hate her, won the popular vote, which in many other countries would have been enough to have her in office," Maples said.

If Virginia joins the compact, there is the possibility that a candidate could win in Virginia, but not receive the votes because they lost the popular vote nationally.

"Not everybody may get represented in how they want, so I mean, but it could go either way," N'yasha Jones said.

House Republicans released a statement on Wednesday against the vote. They said it puts big states like California, Texas and New York in charge of Virginia's vote.

Even if the General Assembly passed the compact, it would not go into effect until its passed by states with the majority of electoral college votes.

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